Tag Archives: blogging

Golf Bloggers Convention???

Las Vegas Convention Center from vegasmeansbusiness.com
Las Vegas Convention Center
from vegasmeansbusiness.com

There was a bit of a buzz from a previous post I authored on how to plan a golf trip.  Some readers asked about getting like minded individuals together for a golf bloggers convention.  Could be a great opportunity to bring folks who love to play and write about the game together.  I’d be up for it, what about you?  There are several ways this could work.  I’ll throw out a few ideas and look to get your feedback.  If there’s enough interest, I’d be happy to get the ball rolling on organization.

Initial thoughts:

  1. Try to make this event as inclusive as possible to boost participation.  Not sure how many golf bloggers there are so that may mean opening it up to perhaps golf writers.  Create our own convention with our own program, or join an existing one and gather together outside the official program for our own activities.  In either case, we’ll need to put a program together to generate interest for participants as well as those who want to bring family members and significant others.
  2. Choose the right time of year and location.  This will have to be in 2016 to leave enough time to plan and for folks traveling internationally to budget.
  3. Perhaps couple it with a noteworthy golf industry event like a trade show, or tournament, where we’d ensure that many more amateur and professional writers would be in attendance, or maybe do our event as a shadow event, or one that immediately follows the main event.  Again, anything to increase participation.
  4. Provide a  locale near a very accessible city, since many will need to travel.  Ensure the destination has ample entertainment, lodging, quality golf courses, meeting facilities, and food options.

Some options on time and place:

  • April 2016(est). Las Vegas Convention Center.  Attend the NMX show (New Media Expo).   This is a convention with 97,000 attendees and features tracks for bloggers.   Obviously this is easiest from an organization standpoint.  You attend, go to the sessions that interest you, and meetup outside of official hours for our own activities.  Here’s a link to the 2015 schedule grid.
  • January 2016. Orlando, Florida.  Shadow  the PGA Merchandise show.  The 2015 show had 41,000+ attendees.  Golf Writers Association of America are sponsors and are in attendence.
  • March 2016. Orlando, Florida.  Shadow the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill.  Orlando is obviously a great venue because of the accessible facilities and entertainment options.  We could attend the tournament for one or more days, meet offsite, play at other courses, socialize and enjoy Orlando.
  • February 2016. San Diego, California.  Shadow the Golf Industry Show.  Predicted to have 14,000+ attendees.
  • Late January/early February 2016. Phoenix, Arizona.  Shadow the Waste Management Open.  Raucous party atmosphere with a good time had by all.  Same idea as Orlando/Bay Hill.

Do any of these sound good?  Shoot me a comment if you’re interested and with suggestions/preferences on time and venue.  Thanks!

 

 

 

 

Ted Bishop: The Latest 140 Character Casualty

By now, most of you have learned of Ex-PGA President Ted Bishop’s dismissal for making sexist remarks while criticizing Ian Poulter on Twitter.  Countless celebrity types have quit social media for the same reason and there’s a lesson to be learned:  You need to keep it positive and clean when using social media.  It’s astounding that so many folks do damage to their reputations, lose jobs, and feel forced to disengage because they cannot filter their brains before firing off a 140 character vent.

Putting this in perspective, look at Bishop.  As of this writing, he had 4,246 Twitter followers.  Twitter purports to have 271 million active users world wide.  Let’s assume 200 million are real, so the math still indicates that 99.99% of Twitter users don’t care what Bishop thinks about or has to say.  Bishop is not a celebrity but a well known individual, and yet he managed to get himself fired based on a random thought consumed by one of the 00.01% of worldwide users who cared to follow him.  The thought is sobering.  It’s not about the content of his comments (many of us have thought and expressed much worse in private), but how such a person of prominence could get himself dismissed for a relatively innocuous muttering.  If he’d have made it in private, there would be no issue.  If he’d have called Poulter and had it out directly, again no issue, but put it out in public with no context, and the damage was done.

Those of us who use Twitter, Facebook, and various blogging tools like this one should be careful.  You may think you’re relatively unknown, but the wrong post can do damage.  Personally, as a user of all three tools, I prefer to blog because your thoughts can be explained in depth and with greater context.  It’s also a forum for folks to respond/rebut, and as an author, you can moderate the conversation.  So whatever tool you use, be mindful to keep it clean and stay civil.